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WHAT IS RADON?

Radon is a radioactive gas that comes from the natural radioactive decay of radium, which is a natural decay product of uranium.  Scientifically, "radon" is known to be radon-222, the most abundant isotope of the element radon.  As a noble gas, radon is colorless, odorless and chemically inert.  It can't be detected by human senses.  Also, since radon is not chemically reactive with most materials, it will move freely as a gas.  Radon has a radiological half-life of 3.8 days, and can move substantial distances from its point of origin.

As radon-222 decays, the first four radioactive isotopes formed are polonium-218, lead-214, bismuth-214 and polonium-214.  They are commonly referred to as “radon daughters” or “radon progeny.”  These short lived Isotopes are not gasses but are chemically active solids.  They are present in any environment where radon is found and, like radon, cannot be detected by human senses.

Uranium is a natural part of the earth’s crust; therefore, radium and radon are also naturally present.  Since uranium and radium concentrations vary throughout the earth’s crust, radon concentrations will also vary.  The amount of radon gas that escapes into the atmosphere is dependent on the depth at which it is formed and the permeability of the surrounding earth.  Radon formed in the top 10 meters of soil and rocks provide the largest component of radon entering the atmosphere.

The second most important contributor to radon is emanation from groundwater.  Underground radon is readily carried in groundwater and when this groundwater surfaces, most of the radon is released to the atmosphere. 

Other sources of radon are very small contributors and are largely due to human activities.  For example, there are radium-rich industrial by-products spread upon the earth, and sometimes construction materials are produces from raw materials that contain uranium or radium.


WHY TEST FOR RADON?

Radon is estimated to cause about 21,000 lung cancer deaths per year, according to EPA's 2003 Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes (EPA 402-R-03-003). The numbers of deaths from other causes are taken from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 1999-2001 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Report and 2002 National Safety Council Reports.  Only smoking causes more lung cancer deaths, but if your home has high radon levels and you smoke, then your risk of lung cancer is especially high. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Lung Assocaition agree that long term exposure to elevated levels of radon pose a significant health risk to you and your family. Therefore, since radon is colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas, the only way to determine if radon is in your home is by testing.


HOW DOES RADON ENTER HOMES OR BUILDINGS?

Radon is a naturally occuring radioactive gas produced by the breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water.  Air pressure inside your home is usually lower than the pressure in the soil around your home's foundation.  Because of this difference in pressure, your house acts like a vacuum, drawing radon in through foundation cracks and other openings. Your home then traps the radon inside, where it can build up. Any home may have a radon problem. This means new and old homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, and homes wiht or without basements.


Radon may also be present in well water and can be released into the air in your ome when water is used for showering and other household uses. In most cases, radon entering the home through water is a small risk compared with radon entering your home from the soil. In a small number of homes, the building materials (e.g., granite and certain concrete produts) can give off radon, although building materials rarely cause radon problems by themselves. In the United States, radon gas in soils is the principal source of elevated radon levels in homes.

Radon Testing Lab Services

Radon in Air Test Kits
Radon in Air Sampling Instructions
Radon in Water

Radiological Lab Services

EMSL can provide Radiological analysis of other isotopes.  For a full list, click here.

 

Full list of services provided for Radon Testing ( click for details )
Laboratories providing Radon Testing ( click for details )
Ann Arbor, MI (LAB 08) - NVLAP Lab Code 101048-4Atlanta, GA (LAB 07) - NVLAP Lab Code 101048-1Baton Rouge, LA (LAB 25) - NVLAP Lab Code 200375-0Beltsville, MD (LAB 19) - NVLAP Lab Code 200293-0Boston, MA (LAB 13) - NVLAP Lab Code 101147-0Buffalo, NY (LAB 14) - NVLAP Lab Code 200056-0Carle Place, NY (LAB 06) - NVLAP Lab Code 101048-10Charlotte, NC (LAB 41) - NVLAP Lab Code 200841-0Chicago, IL (LAB 26) - NVLAP Lab Code 200399-0Cinnaminson, NJ (LAB List in Description) - NVLAP Lab Code 101048-0Dallas, TX (LAB 11) - NVLAP Lab Code 600111-0Denver, CO (LAB 22) - NVLAP Lab Code 200828-0EMSL Canada - Calgary, AB (LAB 65) - NVLAP Lab Code 500100-0EMSL Canada - Montreal, QC (LAB 68) - NVLAP Lab Code 201052-0EMSL Canada - Ottawa, ON (LAB 67) - NVLAP Lab Code 201040-0EMSL Canada - Toronto, ON (LAB 55) - NVLAP Lab Code 200877-0EMSL Canada - Vancouver, BC (LAB 69) - NVLAP Lab Code 201068-0Fort Lauderdale, FL (LAB 56) - NVLAP Lab Code 500085-0Houston, TX (LAB 15) - NVLAP Lab Code 102106-0Huntington Beach, CA (LAB 33) - NVLAP Lab Code 101384-0Indianapolis, IN (LAB 16) - NVLAP Lab Code 200188-0Inland Empire (Ontario), CA (LAB 71) - NVLAP Lab Code 600239-0Jacksonville, FL (LAB 54) - NVLAP Lab Code 600265-0Kernersville, NC (LAB 02) - NVLAP Lab Code 102104-0Las Vegas, NV (LAB 31) - NVLAP Lab Code 600140-0Miami, FL (LAB 17) - NVLAP Lab Code 200204-0Minneapolis, MN (LAB 35) - NVLAP Lab Code 200019-0New York, NY (LAB 03) - NVLAP Lab Code 101048-9Orlando, FL (LAB 34) - NVLAP Lab Code 101151-0Phoenix, AZ (LAB 12) - NVLAP Lab Code 200811-0Piscataway, NJ (LAB 05) - NVLAP Lab Code 101048-2Plymouth Meeting, PA (LAB 18) - NVLAP Lab Code 200699-0Raleigh, NC (LAB 29) - NVLAP Lab Code 200671-0Rochester, NY (LAB 53) - NVLAP Lab Code 600183-0Salem, NH (LAB 23) - NVLAP Lab Code 201051-0San Diego, CA (LAB 43) - NVLAP Lab Code 200855-0San Leandro, CA (LAB 09) - NVLAP Lab Code 101048-3Seattle, WA (LAB 51) - NVLAP Lab Code 200613-0South Pasadena, CA (LAB 32) - NVLAP Lab Code 200232-0South Portland, ME (LAB 62) - NVLAP Lab Code 500094-0St. Louis, MO (LAB 39) - NVLAP Lab Code 200742-0Tampa, FL (LAB 93) - NVLAP Lab Code 600215-0Wallingford, CT (LAB 24) - NVLAP Lab Code 200700-0West Palm Beach, FL (LAB 57) - NVLAP Lab Code 600206-0
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